What is Thermal Black

Thermal carbon black, often referred to as MT black, is unique in several ways. Along the carbon black spectrum, it has the largest particle size and among the lowest degrees of particle aggregation or structure. Since it is derived from natural gas, it is also one of the purest forms of carbon available on an industrial scale. Examples of its uses include applications in rubber, metallurgy, plastics, insulation, concrete and graphite, to name only a few.

The process of producing thermal carbon black involves decomposing natural gas in the absence of oxygen.

  • Each of Cancarb’s five production units includes two reactors.
  • One reactor is preheated to about 1,300 ºC, and natural gas is injected into it and is decomposed into carbon and hydrogen.
  • The carbon/hydrogen mixture is cooled with water and the carbon is separated from the hydrogen in large bag filters.
  • The hydrogen by-product is then used as fuel to preheat the second reactor of the unit.

As the process of producing the carbon consumes energy, the first reactor will eventually cool to a point where the reaction becomes inefficient. This is when the reactors trade roles and the second one becomes the producing reactor while the first one is reheated.